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mohamed morsi played in actually trying to broker this makes all of the logic in the world that we should be trying to foster communication between all of the sides and not ignore one party over the other. >> diana, how challenging is it for hamas to put under its tent, under its umbrella, if you will, splinter groups, offshoots, factions that they necessarily don't have control over? is that where a lot of the problem lies? >> no. the problem largely lies in the fact that there have been competing strategies in terms of how to address israel's occupation. on the one hand abbas said we are only going to pursue negotiations and we've seen those have failed and other sides who have said that clearly the negotiations aren't working. clearly the negotiations have failed and, therefore, we have to pursue another strategy of defending ourselves. now in order for this to move forward, for us as palestinians to be able to move forward and to get this, to actually begin to hold israel accountable, there has to be a unified strategy and all palestinians have come forward and said that they want to
, including president mohamed morsi. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu, thanked morsi for his efforts to help broker the cease-fire. speaking to the israeli prime minister, president obama reaffirmed the united states and said it would use the moment to help israel strengthen security needs especially dealing with the issue of arms and weapons being smuggled into gaza. president obama in talking to president morsi, again, thanked him for his role and talked about the need to try to create and achieve a broader security situation in the region. president obama certainly spent a fair amount of his day yesterday dealing with this. the white house saying that secretary of state hillary clinton did play a pivotal role. one of the key things that they are pointing to that has come out of all of the talks and negotiations, alex, there's a question mark surrounding the egyptian president mohamed morsi, and that question mark has gone away. fe feel president obama's relationship has gotten stronger. he has been talking to him throughout this entire process over the past several days and they f
of thousands of protesters in tahrir square right now standing in opposition to president mohamed morsi and the constitution that was approved earlier today. nbc's richard engel is going to join us live in a moment. >>> possible big news coming from the supreme court today on marriage equality in america. the nine justices are meeting right now. >>> and today's big question. fiscal cliff hardball. should the president be on the road or back in washington hammering out a fiscal cliff compromise? tweet me @thomasaroberts or on facebook. i love the holidays. and with my bankamericard cash rewards credit card, i love 'em even more. i earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. 2% on groceries. 3% on gas. automatically. no hoops to jump through. that's 1% back on... [ toy robot sounds ] 2% on pumpkin pie. and apple. 3% back on 4 trips to the airport. it's as easy as... -[ man ] 1... -[ woman ] 2... [ woman ] 3. [ male announcer ] the bankamericard cash rewards card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. constipated? yeah. mm. some laxatives like dulcolax can cause cramps. but phillips
to put leverage on them. it's a political organization from which mohammed morsi comes from. stability will have long term and regional implications for all of the issues. but in terms of immediate truce, right now it is about what's happening on the ground be in gaza and right now that is not necessarily directly linked. >> all right, everyone. we were listening there to nbc's ayman and we're taking satellite hits. this conflict is raising a question concerning security in the middle east. the role iran played with arming hamas and its own stand offwith israel. joining me is dennis ross of the washington institute for institutional policy. dennis, welcome. let's talk about the role that iran played in this conflict over the last eight, nine days. iron that out for me. >> i think we have to put it into larger perspective. i don't think they've played a role over the last few days. all the arms that, in fact, islamist jihad and others why gaza were using, almost all of them were coming from the iranians. they have built up a long range rocket capacity. that's what the israelis went afte
, the newly installed president of egypt, mohamed morsi, trying to encourage them to engage with hamas. of course, hamas is classified technically with the u.s. government as a terrorist organization, there are no formal ties, trying to engage hamas to stop this rocket attack to come to some sort of solution so cooler heads can prevail, mara. >> one of the things in terms of the political issue here, the president in the past has been criticized for not being strong enough in his support of israel. do you get the response in washington that his response now is significant in satisfying people who would like for him to express stronger support for israel? >> you know, there has been some controversy, some tension, frankly, between prime minister netanyahu and the president. that's no secret. there was the recent episode where the prime minister went before the united nations andrew that red line, you remember, across that little cartoon bomb. some disagreement about when and where that red line should be drawn with respect to iran's nuclear program. but look, there is no question that a
earlier, the real man to watch here is mohammed morsi who is the safeguard, the guarantor of the hamas side of the cease fire agreement. he will be one of the key factors over there in 48 hours, 72 hours about whether or not this cease fire holds. all indications now in the morning new york time looked very dicey. i think it's been two or three hours. it seems like everybody is not going to hopefully turn this into a cease fire breaking event. we'll have to see. >> you talked about mow home home whom mid morsi. when it comes to enforcing what's happening miles away along this border, who is it that will do this? who is it that judges, yousef, whether it's a violation? >> sure. the bigger problem is it was very big. the other part of the problem is while the egyptians have good relations with israel and hamas, they have far more leverage over hamas. the so-called buffer zone that we see is exclusively on territory inside gaza. there's no buffer zone on the israeli side. there's no protection for the people of gaza from the israelis. that so-called buffer zone takes up 50% of the arabal
egyptian president mohammed morsi who played the critical role. he is facing protests in his own country because he's trying to expand and have further reaching powers. do you see this as a power grab? that he's riding on something of a success? >> churchill once said democracy is the worst possible form of government except for anything else that's been tried by human beings. as senate majority leader, faced with constant delay, frustration, filibustering, i often thought, boy, i would like to be king for a day and cut through all of this. democracy is tough. it's messy and morsi is finding that out. i don't think that what he did was right, and i don't think it will hold. >> with regard to what he's doing now by ordering some retrials in terms of hosni mubarak and his cabinet, what might that do to the situation there? do you worry that would have inflaming factions there? >> i think it clearly will trigger protests. had already has for many leading officials. not so much with respect to that one action but by the truly sweeping powers he claims to himself and even if he is sincere in
jim's top courts today suspended their work in protest of president mohamed morsi's decr decree. joining me to talk more about the middle east is ambassador dennis ross, an expert on the region. he was the chief middle east negotiate for president clinton and president bush and served as a special adviser for president obama. he is a mideast analyst. both supporters and opponents are planning more giant protests on friday as well as sad. what's your assessment of the situation and the back and forth between the two sides? >> well, i think what we're seeing is is that this is a new egypt. anybody who thought that president morsi could come in and act like president mubarak and could rule as opposed to govern, there's no doubt that's not the case. there's no doubt he miscalculated. he thought in the aftermath of brokering a ceasefire between israel and hamas, that gave him a new standing internationally, gave him new stature in the region, and it did and he could somehow use that to convert it into new power within egypt himself. what he's finding is in fact the new egypt is an eg
to cairo, she spent hours with morsi and with his foreign minister, mohammed kamul, finding the compromise that israel and hamas could live with. mainly stop the hostilities today and negotiate the other demands later. alex? >> jim, thank you very much for that live report from cairo with the latest on the brokering of the truce. joining me now, former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. for special affairs, stewart is a special assistant to the president and is currently president and ceo of the nonpartisan meridian international center in washington. welcome, stewart, thank you for being here on thanksgiving. >> good morning. >> you were also partly raised in the middle east. your father served in the foreign service. you've seen firsthand from a young age that cease-fires have a history of collapsing. do you feel this one is different? >> well, no, actually, they're very fragile in the middle east. these cycles can break down at any moment. but in this case, what you have is the emergence of a consensus that, you know, on the israeli side, the cost of a ground invasion was not something that th
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9